David Stegon

David Stegon is a writer, editor, and father of two based in Virginia. He has written for traditional and digital publications for the past 13 years. David holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Temple University and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

The Never Ending Need for Patience

It was Thanksgiving day, and my family was making the nearly two-hour drive to my father-in-law’s house. He lives in a rural part of Virginia, so while the trip there is filled with beautiful scenery, it lacks things like gas stations, rest stops, and fast food restaurants.
We’ve made the trip so many times, though, we know where to stop. There is a large gas station about halfway through the trip that makes for a good break for everyone, a place to fill up on gas, grab a drink, and yes, go to the bathroom.
On this particular trip, we made our usual stop. My 4-year-old daughter — the main reason for our stop — said she didn’t need to go to the bathroom. We took her at her word and carried on down the road. Ten minutes later, of course, she said she now had to go.

The Unexplained Potty Accident: How Potty Training Never Stops

My wife thought someone spilled a drink. I thought someone had a bathroom accident. I never realized that someone would be my daughter who had been potty trained for nearly two years at this point, but I was wrong.
In the rush of the day and the excitement of the train set, my daughter had an accident, and a bad one at that.

Fun Potty Training Tips

Let’s be honest: Potty training is not fun.
Between the stress, frustration, and clean-up, potty training can be a particularly not fun time for parents, especially when children struggle to learn. That stress, though, cannot find its way to the child. If potty training becomes a miserable experience – filled with yelling, scolding, and generally not fun times – kids will likely come to dread the potty training experience.

Using Bribery to Improve Potty Training

Like most parents, my wife and I have a complicated relationship with bribes. We want our children to listen to us when we tell them what to do. We are the parents. They are the children. We are in charge. But then there are times when we are tired or worn out, or just need a break from arguing, and we fall into the trap a lot of parents do: if you do what we say, we will give you something you want.