Advice from Professionals

Potty training advice from doctors, teachers, and professional caregivers

should toilet training focus on urination or bowel movement

Should Toilet Training Focus on Urination or Bowel Movements ?

You should not begin potty training until your child has developed some control. If his bowel movements are very predictable, you might want to start there. If not, or if he goes only once a day, you might want to focus on urination. Most children learn either way, eventually, without significant difficulty.

Troubles can develop in some children no matter how they are trained. Children who learn to hold onto their stool can develop stool retention and constipation. Other children cannot stay dry at night and continue to wet the bed for years. You can talk to your child’s doctor about these problems.

If any approach significantly upsets your child, you may just need to take a break from training and return to it later.

4 potty training tips for you and your spouse

4 Potty Training Tips for You and Your Spouse

One of the big things about guys is that we like to do things on our own. To our exasperated wives, it often seems like “just let me do that” were the REAL first words out of our mouths.

A word to the wise, though: potty training is unlike anything you’ve done before. And if you think you should handle it on your own, you’re out of your mind.

Sure, single dads don’t have a lot of choices, but if you and your wife live under the same roof, it’s important you learn how to tag team this whole potty training challenge.

We’ve made it easy for you; here’s four ways to get started!

how to teach boys to pee standing up

How to Teach Boys to Pee Standing Up

Boys do not need to urinate standing up. During toilet training, boys, like girls, should learn to pee sitting down. Essentially all toilet training experts agree about this.

There are many reasons to teach boys to urinate sitting:

• Most people urinate when they have a bowel movement, immediately before, or . The two are associated naturally and trying to separate them makes learning more difficult.

• Standing to urinate involves more skills.

• Most boys of toilet training age will have difficulty aiming accurately.

• Even if they can aim, boys may not want to. Either way, this means more work for parents who must clean up.

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are rewards for potty training necessary

Are Rewards for Potty Training Necessary?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, behaviors are more likely to continue when followed by a positive consequence, like a reward. However, when it comes to potty training, there are opposing opinions, and both sides of the argument have valid points. This is only meant to help with a dilemma. You have to do what you believe will work for your child. Nonetheless, when I started researching whether or not to reward your child when potty training, I started questioning my own methods.

wetting the bed at night

Wetting the Bed at Night

Many children continue wetting the bed at night for years after finishing toilet training. Although this can be upsetting, it is not usually a sign of a serious problem and is considered normal up to at least age five. Even at age seven, 5 to 10% of children in the United States still wet the bed. Without any treatment at all, 15% of these children will stop wetting each year, although a small number may continue to do so as adults.

4 best youtube videos to help with potty training

4 of the Best Potty Training Videos on YouTube

Growing up, guys had a pretty simple way to learn things: ask your dad! Whether you want to know how to throw a football or ride a bike, dad had the tips and tricks you needed to hear.

Now that we’re all grown up, though, it’s not as easy to ask dad for help. And let’s be honest: he was never super helpful when it came to potty training tips. This is where YouTube comes in.

There is a constant stream of helpful videos on YouTube explaining how to do almost anything. And yes, there are countless videos meant to help with potty training. In fact, there are so many you might have a difficult time figuring out where to start.

Don’t worry, though; we’ve got your back! We scoured the internet and came up with the four best videos to help you and your kid with potty training.

potty training with consistency and repetition

Potty Training with Consistency and Repetition

The first day of potty training did not go well. My wife and I told my then two-year-old daughter that we felt like she needed to walk over to the toilet, pull down her underwear and use the bathroom.

For us adults, it seemed incredibly simple. To a toddler, not so much. Despite asking my daughter almost every five minutes if she needed to use the bathroom, she said she was okay. She would then pee on the floor. It was an imperfect process that showed its flaws.

5 numbers to know before you start potty training

Potty Training Schedule: 5 Numbers to Know Before Potty Training

One stereotype about guys that happens to be true is that we like numbers. We’re not always good with feelings and emotions, but we’re happy with any cold, hard facts we can get our hands on.

This is true for potty training our kids as well. There are a lot of “experts” out there, but it can be hard to get any real data that you can use.

These are the kinds of numbers you need to make potty training easier, but they are hard to find. Fortunately, we’ve put together a definitive guide to five numbers to know before you start potty training your kid.

The Dangers of Early Potty Training

There are so many reasons for wanting to potty train your child as early as possible. You want to stop buying diapers; they’re bad for the environment, expensive and gross. You want your child to be ahead of the game. The reasons are a no-brainer. However, the reasons for wanting to potty train your child early seem silly compared to the magnitude of the reasons why you shouldn’t.
According to Dr. Steve Hodges, M.D., of the website BedwettingAndAccidents.com, it is unreasonable to put children under the age of three in a position that makes them fully responsible for their own toileting habits.